Articles Posted in Product Liability

The Fourth of July may be over, but the use of fireworks by people on vacation continues in the summer months. If you shrugged off warnings before the Fourth of July about the danger of fireworks and their potential to cause serious injury, you might be interested in a couple of post-holiday news items.

We refer, of course, to reports about two NFL stars who suffered disfiguring injuries in fireworks accidents over the holiday weekend: C.J. Wilson, a North Carolina native who plays with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and New York Giants defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul.

Wilson, who is from Lincoln County and played at N.C. State University, lost the index and middle fingers on one hand, and Pierre-Paul had his right index finger amputated and suffered fractures to his right thumb.

These are two pro athletes, which means they have great reflexes and physical instincts and are strong and physically fit.

Continue Reading

The Takata airbag recall has been highly publicized and is considered one of the most massive vehicle recalls in recent history. It involves 34 million vehicles across multiple manufacturers and brands, but it is just the tip of the iceberg on auto product recalls. Countless recalls have been issued on all types of auto products capable of causing serious or fatal car accidents and injuries.

According to Forbes and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), auto-related recalls went up to 22 million in 2013, a 25 percent increase from the previous year, making it the industry’s highest rate since 2004. CNN Money reports 2014 recall numbers hit a new record with more than 74.2 million vehicle recalls. In total, close to 100 million vehicles have been recalled in the past year and a half alone. What makes this statistic so frightening is the majority of the cars affected by these recalls have yet to be repaired. Continue Reading

Backyard barbecues are a summer staple in American society. As soon as the weather warms, people in the Upstate area head outside to fire up those grills and cook a feast for family and friends. Many people, young and old, have fond memories of picnics around their backyard barbecues.

Fun can be had at these outings, but safety must remain a top concern. Fire and burn injuries are common when propane and charcoal grills are not handled correctly. Inexperience, distractions, alcohol and a wide range of other factors can contribute to serious or fatal burn injuries.

Grill Fire and Injury Statistics

  • According to statistics from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA): Grilling is responsible for an average of 8,800 home fires each year.
  • Approximately 16 percent of these fires are caused when the barbecue is lit and result from an item or object being close enough to catch on fire.
  • One in five grill fires stems from either a leak or broken piece of equipment.
  • In one recent year, 16,900 people were treated in emergency departments for burn injuries associated with grills.
  • Close to half of all burn injuries involving grills are a result of individuals sustaining thermal burns. Continue Reading

A frequent question from our clients is how do contingency fees work? We do almost all of our personal injury work on a contingency fee basis. That means the fee is a percentage of the amount we recover for the client. Depending on the kind of case, contingency fees can range from 25% to 40%. Also depending on the kind of case, certain amounts recovered are not subject to the contingency fee. There is an infinite variety of ways to structure a contingency fee.

Contingency fees have significant advantage over hourly fees. If you hire a lawyer on an hourly basis, typically they are going to require an upfront payment and then bill monthly. The attorney will expect to get paid monthly. If the client stops paying, then the attorney will stop working and move to terminate the relationship. Most insurance companies pay their lawyers either on an hourly basis or sometimes on a flat fee basis. In a contingency fee case, the lawyer gets a part of the recovery. Said another way, the lawyer doesn’t get paid unless the client gets paid. Often times our cases run on for years, and most clients can’t afford to pay attorneys on an hourly basis for years. Our clients prefer contingency fees because it is financially the best way for them to hire a lawyer to protect their interest.

Continue Reading

One of the latest and most sought-after technological advancements is Google Glass. Google Glass is a wearable technology fitted with an optical display that allows wearers to see digital information, like that from a smartphone, right in front of their eyes. With Google Glass, wearers can see as they would through ordinary glasses while using the device hands-free. They are able to receive phone calls, read emails, and engage in any other online activities. A benefit of Google Glass is that it gives people a chance to continue to stay connected, even when away from the desk, when enroute to a meeting, or during other activities. Google Glass has even been introduced into medical procedures, showing promise as a training tool.

The Impact Google Glass May Have on Your Vision

What about the drawbacks? What risks does Google Glass pose? Could the design of Google Glass be a contributing factor in car accidents?

We are happy to hear that the FDA is taking a serious look at transvaginal mesh devices. But that action may be too little and too late for thousands of women who have been harmed by these medical products.

Our product injury lawyers at Grimes Teich Anderson may be able to help you if you or someone you love has been injured by transvaginal mesh.

Transvaginal mesh surgical products have come under fire in recent years for causing severe injuries and complications as a result of erosion and disintegration of the mesh support, which can cut through the vaginal lining and perforate the bladder, bowels, and other organs.

According to a recent government study, motor vehicle deaths of children have fallen 43 percent over the last 10 years, largely attributed to the increased use of child safety restraints.

The bad news is that there were still more than 9,000 children who died in crashes during that time, and what’s more, the child safety seats that millions of children are currently using may not be as safe as manufacturers purport.

Our Spruce Pine car accident attorneys note motor vehicle accidents remain a leading cause of death and serious injury for children under the age of 12 in this country. In North Carolina, children are required to be restrained in either a car or booster seat on every trip through the age of 7 or until they reach 80 pounds. Beyond that, they have to be strapped into a regular adult safety belt. The law also requires children under 5 and weighing less than 40 pounds be seated in the back seat of the vehicle.

Contact Information